Kamikaze Kate ~ Always in a Hurry

The 30-something woman wearing work-out clothes with her hair pulled into a quick ponytail hurried into the deli aisle at the grocery, pushing aside the other shoppers. Then she forcefully stepped forward at the cheese case.

“Darn! Where is that block cheese that was on sale in the flyer?” she said to no one in particular.

“Right here,” shopper Rosalie pointed out as she reached for a bag of already grated cheese for herself. “You’re buying the cheese in bulk to save money, right?!”

“Yeah.” She grabbed the cheese and scurried off to the dairy case in search of the next items on her list. As Rosalie watched the young woman’s progress across the store, she was glad she wasn’t in the way. It was downright dangerous.

Kamikaze Kate” that’s what I’ll call her, Rosalie decided.

At the dairy case, Kamikaze Kate scattered the shoppers as she pushed forward to retrieve her flavor and brand. Kate accidently knocked a yogurt out of a shopper’s hand as the other person was reading the label.

“Sorry. I’m just in a big hurry this morning.”

While the shopper retrieved it from the floor, she noticed the yogurt didn’t suffer any injuries.

As Rosalie made her way shopped her way down her own list, she noticed Kamikaze Kate’s route zig-zagging through the store to the produce aisle. Kate had just collided with a senior lady holding a live basil plant and it fell to the floor.

Rosalie noticed that the senior had picked up the plant, tenderly dusted the leaves of loose potting soil and smiled at Kate. “Fresh basil like this really wakes up spaghetti sauce and anything with tomatoes. It’s great! Smell this!” She herself sniffed the fragrant leaves. You want to try this one?   I’ll pick up another.”

“Sorry. No time.”

Close by, another senior lady was carefully inspecting the portabella mushrooms in a basket, turning them over and checking the stems when Kate stepped up next to her, grabbed a handful and jammed them in a bag.

“You can tell how fresh the mushrooms are if you check the bottom of the caps,” the senior shopper told her. “They should be closed, not open with the underside showing. It makes a world of difference in flavor and cooking.”

“Sorry. I’m in a hurry,” apologized Kate. “Maybe another time.”

Kate rushed out of the store, nearly taking out a couple of shoppers with her basket as they strolled in. “No time,” she complained.

Time. Each of us has the same 24 hours. Yet in today’s demanding world, compacting time and multitasking leaves little left for what God thinks is important. But what is important?

Described are the characteristics of Christ: “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. “ [Galatians 5:22]

Even when pushing a shopping cart through the local grocery, those traits can shine on others. None are downright dangerous like getting in Kamikaze Kate’s way. Time. Invest it in God’s plans and ways. Take time to smell the basil and enjoy wherever God takes you.

It’s worth it and so are you. In a subtle way, you are touching the world one heart at a time.

[Jo Russell is a Christian speaker, author of scores of articles, a half dozen anthology contributions, and award-winning Which Button Do You Push to Get God to Come Out? A Humorous Devotional for Women available where print books and e-books are sold.  Look for Give Us This Day Our Daily Grin – A Fun-Lovers Guide to Spiritual Living and Growing now released for pre-sales on Amazon Kindle and other e-formats Smashwords as well as print coming soon. Jo lives in northeast Arizona and writes a popular humorous weekly blog on her website, www.button-to-god.com.]

 

 

 

About the author : Jo Russell

Jo Russell

Award-winning author, speaker, blogger, Jo Russell keeps us laughing at every day challenges through her experiences as a single mom raising sons from diapers to adult. With humor, Jo reaches out to show others how to cope in all stages of life and stay sane. She posts a humorous weekly blog on http://www.button-to-god.com.

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